Would Stability Control Solve Rollover Problem

Full-size domestic vans, once the transportation (and often accommodation) of choice for the post-hippy generation, were recently deemed less than safe by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB).

Now, 12 and 15-passenger versions are most often seen shuttling passengers to and from airports. According to Associated Press, to ensure occupant safety the NTSB is requesting the Big 3 automakers make significant upgrades by model year 2006, including the addition of shoulder belts for all passengers as well as improved roof strengthening to offset injury in case of rollover.

 

Why the sudden cry of concern? Recently a variety of high-profile accidents have brought to light the categorys poor results in rollover tests, reminding all that it was only last year when the NTSB challenged automakers to include safety technologies such as stability control in large vans.

 

Now, 12 and 15-passenger versions are most often seen shuttling passengers to and from airports. According to Associated Press, to ensure occupant safety the NTSB is requesting the Big 3 automakers make significant upgrades by model year 2006, including the addition of shoulder belts for all passengers as well as improved roof strengthening to offset injury in case of rollover.

 

Why the sudden cry of concern? Recently a variety of high-profile accidents have brought to light the categorys poor results in rollover tests, reminding all that it was only last year when the NTSB challenged automakers to include safety technologies such as stability control in large vans.